Last edited by Kazit
Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

6 edition of 100 Q&A About Cancer and Fertility (100 Questions & Answers about . . .) found in the catalog.

100 Q&A About Cancer and Fertility (100 Questions & Answers about . . .)

by Lindsay Beck

  • 295 Want to read
  • 40 Currently reading

Published by Jones and Bartlett Publishers, Inc. .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Popular medicine,
  • Oncology,
  • Medical,
  • Diet / Health / Fitness,
  • Diseases - Cancer,
  • Infertility,
  • Health & Fitness / General,
  • Complications,
  • Fertility,
  • Fertility, Human,
  • Miscellanea,
  • Consumer Health

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages180
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8037358M
    ISBN 100763740497
    ISBN 109780763740498

    Cancer, and some cancer treatments, can affect your reproductive health. It could be worth considering ways of preserving your fertility before starting your treatment. When you're told you have cancer, your ability to have children (your fertility) may be the furthest thing from your mind.   Sarah Roberts, blogger at Working Girl Life, shares her experience of managing fertility concerns alongside her breast cancer treatment at the age of I never thought cancer would be a part of the process 'You have cancer and you will need to undergo chemotherapy.' After the initial 'What the f**k?' moments, my thoughts quickly went to fertility.. I know many of you may think, but what.

    Fertility Preservation For Cancer Patients: Success Stories Breast cancer patient, age 36 Rebecca came to us on the recommendation of her oncologist immediately after learning of her cancer diagnosis. Starting a family is an experience that many look forward to their whole lives. Unfortunately, a cancer diagnosis can threaten one’s chance of having this experience. The extent to which your fertility is compromised is based on many factors, including age, type of cancer and method of treatment.

    Methods. Charts of patients aged 18–40 years with newly diagnosed crc presenting to the Juravinski Cancer Centre from to were reviewed for documentation of discussions regarding fertility risks with treatment and reproductive options available. The influences of sex, age, year of diagnosis, stage of cancer, and type of treatment on the frequency of discussions were by: They also cut the pathway for sperm cells to be included in the semen. Men with testicular cancer or colon cancer sometimes have surgery that can cause ejaculatory dysfunction. Testing for Fertility. A man’s fertility status both before and after treatment can affect his ability to have children after cancer.


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100 Q&A About Cancer and Fertility (100 Questions & Answers about . . .) by Lindsay Beck Download PDF EPUB FB2

Whether you're a newly diagnosed cancer patient, a survivor, or loved one of someone suffering from infertility, this book offers help. The 100 Q&A About Cancer and Fertility book text available to provide both the doctor's and patient's views, Questions & Answers About Cancer & Fertility, provides practical, authoritative answers to of the most common questions asked by 5/5(1).

Whether you're a newly diagnosed cancer patient, a survivor, or loved one of someone suffering from infertility, this book offers help.

The only text available to provide both the doctor's and patient's views, Questions & Answers About Cancer & Fertility, provides practical, authoritative answers to of the most common questions asked. Now including an entire new section on the impact of cancer on sexuality, intimacy and fertility, Questions & Answers About Breast Cancer, Third Edition is written by a prominent breast cancer advocate and survivor and by a cancer book is an invaluable resource for anyone coping with the physical and emotional turmoil of this.

Special emphasis is placed on diagnostic and treatment algorithms. Topics covered include demographics of cancer in the reproductive age male, fertility conditions which predispose to cancer development, the role of assisted reproduction for fertility management, as well as fertility preservation strategies for the male and female cancer : Hardcover.

Excerpted from " Questions & Answers About Cancer & Fertility," by Kutluk H. Oktay, MD, Cornell University Weill Medical College, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical Center.

Questions & Answers About Esophageal Cancer: Medicine & Health Science Books @ by: 2. EMPOWER YOURSELF. Whether you’re a newly diagnosed myeloma patient, a survivor, or a friend or relative of either, this book offers help. The only text to provide the doctor’s and patient’s views, Questions & Answers About Myeloma, Third Edition gives you authoritative, practical answers to your questions about treatment options, post-treatment quality of life, sources of support 5/5(12).

cancer fertility preservation guidance working group, VIC. Fertility and Cancer was developed as part of a research study into the experience of fertility after cancer led by Prof Jane Ussher at the Centre for Health Research, Western Sydney University.

For a list of the other chief and partner investigators, see Before undergoing cancer treatment where fertility may be at risk, women may want to freeze their eggs and men may want to freeze their sperm. Egg freezing is a new practice that is quickly evolving.

While it is not as well established as sperm or embryo freezing, it has become an increasingly successful form of fertility preservation for women. Cancer by Cancer and Fertility UK August 7, I talk to patient Paul about his experience with fertility preservation.

Fertility Preservation by Cancer and Fertility UK Cancer Blogger Rachel Bland blogs about Cancer, Fertility. For more information about how cancer affects fertility, see Key questions.

What is infertility. Infertility is defined as difficulty conceiving (getting pregnant). For women under 35 years of age, the term usually refers to trying to conceive for 12 months; if a woman is 35 or over, the term is used after 6. How age affects fertility.

Age is one of the most important factors that influences the impact of cancer treatment on fertility. Women’s age and fertility – Women are born with all the eggs they will have in their lifetime, but as women age, the number of eggs reduces.

Fertility starts to decline after 30 and the decline speeds up after In general, fertility preservation is the process of saving or protecting eggs, sperm, or reproductive tissue so that a person can use them to have biological children in the future.

It may be time sensitive and could also be necessary to explore prior to cancer treatment. This book provides a comprehensive overview on issues surrounding fertility in patients who have been diagnosed with breast cancer or belong to a high-risk population.

The impact of breast cancer treatment on fertility is clearly explained and all the available options for fertility preservation are discussed, including the use of assisted Format: Hardcover. Whether You're A Newly Diagnosed Cancer Patient, A Survivor, Or Loved One Of Someone Suffering From Infertility, This Book Offers Help.

The Only Text Available To Provide Both The Doctor's And Patient's Views, Questions & Answers About Cancer & Fertility, Provides Practical, Authoritative Answers To Of The Most Common Questions Asked By.

During cancer treatment, patients have important and complex issues to consider, including present and future fertility. Because many cancer treatments can damage future fertility, patients who are or will be at a childbearing age (or parents of children with cancer) should ask their cancer care team about the possible impact treatment might have on their ability to have children so they can.

Questions & Answers About Prostate Cancer provides authoritative and practical answers to the most common questions asked by patients and their loved ones. Providing both doctor and patient perspectives, this easy-to-read book is a comprehensive guide to the basics of prostate cancer, risk factors and prevention, diagnosis, treatment.

Women's fertility and cancer treatment This section provides an overview of cancer treatments and how they affect women's fertility. The most common treatments for cancer are chemotherapy, radiation therapy, surgery and hormone therapy. Cancer and Infertility T Cancer and its treatment can cause great damage to the reproductive organs.

Most fertility damage is caused by the use of chemotherapy and radiation therapy to the abdominal area. However, if you are a cancer patient, there are options for preserving your fertility. Praise for the Second Edition “This is an excellent, easily-understandable, and up-to-date book that concisely answers almost every question my patients and families of patients with bladder cancer have asked me in recent years Questions and Answers About Bladder Cancer, Second Edition is an invaluable resource for patients to better understand their disease and treatment.

As modern medicine improves survival odds, many young cancer patients are living long lives that bear the markings of the disease and its treatment. The side effects of chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery often include damage to fertility, such as early menopause or the loss of viable sperm.

A recent issue of the journal Narrative Inquiry Read more. There isn't definitive evidence that pregnancy affects the prognosis of women diagnosed with breast cancer. But every situation is unique and needs to be evaluated.

If your prognosis is good and pregnancy would be relatively safe, talk to your doctor and a fertility expert about your options for preserving fertility.This book provides an excellent overview of the many effects that cancer can have on an individual. Overall, the book successfully achieves its goal of increasing professionals’ knowledge and confidence in working with cancer survivors who commonly face a multitude of concerns, and it is an excellent resource for clinicians and survivors alike.